Join Visibility Software at GPUG Summit Nashville! A Dynamic Opportunity for the Dynamics GP Community

Posted by Mark Jackson on Tue, Aug, 22, 2017 @ 08:08 AM

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Hey y’all!

What are your plans October 10-13, 2017? We are a proud sponsor of GPUG Summit Nashville, one of the most engaging conferences in the industry. And as a sponsor, Visibility Software is excited to share this experience with you this October in Nashville, TN as we squeeze every last bit of functionality out of the products and get you the ROI you want—and deserve.

Why YOU should attend

GPUG Summit is THE go-to conference bringing together industry experts, software development vendors, and everyday users to discuss important issues, trends, product updates, customer pain points, and genuine solutions. The value of GPUG Summit is endless! Here are a few more reasons why you should attend: 

  • Meet & network with your user group buddies: Nowhere else will you find the collective Microsoft Dynamics® GP brainpower than at GPUG Summit.
  • Geek out over great content: There’s no better instructor than an actual Dynamics GP user. Receive deep level technical training in a focused environment on Dynamics GP functions that you can utilize 365 days a year.
  • Serve as a voice: Speak with vendors and Microsoft representatives so they understand your product pain points and can grow your industry with their products and future development.
  • Evaluate and test solutions: Understand third party solutions and learn what they can do for your industry or organization.

How to engage with us at GPUG Summit

We invite you to stop on by our booth (#363) to learn about our recruiting and training management solutions that integrate with Microsoft Dynamics® GP and other HR systems to automate and streamline the entire recruiting, hiring, onboarding and training management process.

Artwork commissioned for you

To celebrate the inspiring Nashville location, along with the inspirational Dynamics community, Dynamic Communities commissioned a remarkable piece of custom art. Over the next few months, they will be revealing parts of this unique artwork until it’s fully unveiled at GPUG Summit. Learn more and don’t miss out on the reveal. 

So giddy-up, grab your boots, and join Visibility Software in Nashville!

 

Tags: training management, recruiting, recruiting strategy, gpug, microsoft dynamics gp, gpug summit, nashville, tn

5 Tips to Launching an Effective Learning Management & Employee Development Program

Posted by Mark Jackson on Mon, Jul, 31, 2017 @ 15:07 PM

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Are you considering implementing a formalized employee development program? It is an investment that’s likely to pay off. Organizations with a career development program in place enjoy up to 250 percent higher productivity. And the benefits don’t stop there. Reduced turnover, higher employee engagement levels, increased innovation and improved risk management are some of the additional benefits companies realize when they implement a formal training and career development program. Training also serves as a recruiting tool – you’re more likely to attract and keep good employees if you offer them development opportunities. 

If your company doesn’t have a training and development program in place, it may seem daunting to get started. But it doesn’t have to be. Here are five basics to keep in mind as you work to implement an effective and efficient employee training and development solution in your organization. 

1. Consider it an investment

There is a tendency among business owners and executives to view employee training as an optional expense — and that mindset can prove very costly to your organization in the long run. The moment you think of employee development and training as just another expenditure, you’ll neglect it. Instead, think of it as an investment that can prove extremely valuable for the long-term success and growth of your organization.  

2. Remember you’re planning a program, not an event

A training program is more than just a series of unrelated courses or workshops. It should reflect your organization’s goals, as well as the needs of your staff. What's important is that your staff training program has some reason behind its structure. An unrelated series of presentations or activities might have some value, but it will benefit neither the staff nor the organization as much as a training program that forms a coherent whole. Spend the time to outline and flesh-out your course offering, aligning it with your business needs and goals. Document the desired outcomes of each course and determine how you will measure and track those outcomes. 

3. Involve your staff

Make a point to involve staff members in the planning and implementation of your training program. The people who actually do the work are usually in the best position to figure out what their needs are. Ask questions, gather input, and structure training opportunities that meet employees where they are and take them where they want or need to go. Training breeds commitment, and committed employees are happier and more productive. 

4. Incorporate the basics - but don’t stop there

Companies often decide to implement a training program to address compliance matters (think OSHA or Department of Labor), manage risk ((think sexual harassment and diversity training), and/or professional certification or credential tracking (think nurses, teachers or commercial truck drivers) – and these are certainly areas that benefit from a formalized approach to training. Job function training is another common (and worthy) goal of an employee training program.  

As you plan your training program, consider broadening it into a full-fledged employee development program. Think of training as a retention tool, helping to instill loyalty and commitment from employees. One idea would be to offer career development courses, enabling employees to prepare themselves for promotion. Staff will be more likely to stay if you offer them ways to learn and grow while at your company. Don't give them a reason to move on by letting them stagnate once they've mastered initial tasks.  

5. Leverage technology

A training and development initiative won’t succeed if it isn’t easy to maintain. Companies often rely on spreadsheets, Word documents and calendar reminders to track employee training. Usually these programs were initiated when the company was much smaller, or was training fewer individuals. A disjointed system like this requires administrators to enter data in multiple locations, making reporting, analytics and data sharing virtually impossible. While this may work when your training needs are minimal, as you grow this system becomes overly labor intensive. 

Employee training, with the myriad of details to be tracked, is an ideal candidate for automation. Not long ago, learning management software was only within financial reach of the largest companies. But now, there are affordable learning management solutions accessible to small and mid-sized companies. Give your initiative the best chance of succeeding by establishing an easy to manage infrastructure that’s both scalable and accessible. 

Interested in more? Check out our Best Practices Guide - 

3 Steps to Achieve Talent Development that Drives Organizational Success 

 

Tags: training, employee engagement, learning management system, training management, learning & development, employee development

4 Reasons Why You Need to Invest in Employee Development

Posted by Mark Jackson on Thu, Jun, 29, 2017 @ 11:06 AM

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According to Training Mag, the average amount a midsize company dedicated to the training budget was $1.5 million.

Companies of every size are shelling out the big bucks to train their new employees. Why? Because new employees are an investment and the future and they need to be molded into the common practices and company culture of the workforce in which they are placed. Communication is key in order to keep those new nuggets of talent and in case you hadn’t heard the cost of replacing an employee is through the roof these days. It costs 50-60% of an employee’s annual salary. 

So why should you revamp your employee development program?

 

1. Engaging with your employees leads to SUCCESS

This one’s a no-brainer, but is often seriously overlooked. Engage with your employees, especially your new ones. The more your employees participate in company culture and are associated with the company’s goals and interests the more they can support all those pieces.

 “Employee development is a way that you can keep your employees engaged at work to prevent that kind of boredom from setting in. Interesting training programs, and future development events that are fun or challenging to look forward to — this removes the plodding daily feel to a job that leads to that dreaded boredom.”

-Chad Halvorson, When I Work

 

Unsurprisingly, 70% of employees who don’t have confidence in the abilities of senior leadership are not fully engaged. Engagement is easy when tackled from a conscious standpoint.

Tweet This: See what happens when employees don't believe in the abilities of senior leadership:

 

2. The fiscal and emotional costs of replacing an employee

The stresses that come with replacing an employee can sometimes outweigh the fiscal costs of replacing said employee. Our advice? Avoid it all together with a streamlined, simple, informative and productive employee development process. For example, companies are re-engineering their talent development and learning management systems. 

In need of some help in this department? Check out Visibility’s learning management resources to help aid in the assistance of employee development.

 

3. HR Professionals are constantly looking for ways to improve their processes

Keep up on your employee development processes. Setting up a good platform in which an employee can learn paves the way for successful training and continual development in the future. 80% of companies believe HR skills are an issue and 39% rate this as an outright issue. 

 “Highly-structured, one-size-fits-all learning programs don’t work anymore. Individuals must own, self-direct, and control their learning futures. Yet they can’t do it alone, nor do you want them to. The development and growth of your talent is vital to your ongoing success, ability to innovate, and overall productivity.”

- Keith Ferrazzi, Entrepreneur

 

4. Informal learning, while great, should not be your main vessel of training

Who doesn’t love inadvertent learning? That special kind of learning sharp witted new employees simply pick up from observing and inferring from other employees? While this type of “off the cuff” training is great, it should NOT be a company’s only means for knowledge sharing. An astounding 87% of companies rate "retention, engagement, and culture" as an important imperative and 50% rate it "urgent."

Leaving too much for an employee to infer can lead to major communication problems in the long run. Misinterpretation is the essence of all workplace issues! Be nothing if not overly clear about what you expect from your employees.

Now you have your reasons, but here comes the real work. Check out the many solutions Visibility Software has to offer to enhance employee development if you don’t know where to start. You might be surprised at just how easy employee development can really be and the postive impact it will have!

For more check out our best practices guide - 

Best Practices Guide - 3 Steps To Achieve Talent Development That Drives Organizational Success

 

Tags: learning management system, training management, learning & development, employee development, talent development

Succession Planning: The Core Issue of Leadership Failings

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Mar, 22, 2017 @ 10:03 AM

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An organizational succession plan should always have a plan B. It is one of the biggest problems for any business and a core issue for leadership. Succession planning is like an insurance plan for the survival of your business. So it stands to reason then, that if you don’t have a succession plan, you can’t ensure that your business will survive after your resignation. The good news is, it’s never too late to start the development of a succession plan. All you and your team have to do is answer a few questions and write the plan to set it in motion once it’s needed.

Succession planning was recently identified as one of the top three immediate HR issues that needed to be dealt with (Bersin and Associates). It’s no easy task however, and as it becomes a higher priority as Baby Boomers enter retirement (3.6 million baby boomers were expected to retire this year) it’s of growing importance to be able to answer these questions. 

  1. How many people will be leaving the organization - both voluntarily and involuntarily - over the next 5-7 years?
    The youngest Baby Boomers turn 50 this year and are preparing to retire. Your organization has to be ready for the retirement or removal of key players to the team. The maturing age group makes up 13% of the American population, and that could mean a large percentage of employees retiring from your organization.

  1. What skill sets will those employees who are leaving take with them?
    In preparation for several key members to leave the organization, understand what their positions are. Detail job descriptions accordingly so the team can adjust functionally and culturally for the impending change.

  1. Will we recruit externally or promote from within to fill those gaps?
    A vast majority of organizations - 77% of them - realize the significance of internally recruiting candidates for promotion. However, even though so many understand this key fact, 54% do less than one-third of their recruitment from within the organization. Take into account the financial responsibility of committing to an external recruitment plan and if that’s a risk your organization is willing to take. While internal recruitment strategies may save the budget, external recruitment can bring life and fresh ideas into the office.

  1. What’s going on outside the organization that could affect my ability to recruit the employees we need?
    Pay attention to economic and employment trends. Mass layoffs and the size of college graduating classes are just two examples that can have an impact on how your team formulates a recruitment strategy.

  1. Where is the supply of candidates going to come from?
    Your career page, job boards, and social job advertisement all have a part in recruitment strategies. What do they have in common? They are all on the internet. Online recruiting can save companies as much as 50% in cost-per-hire.

  1. Where will our company be in 3-5 years, and what does that mean for the type of people we will need to recruit?
    Projecting your organizational needs as well as employee needs can help decide the future of your team. This can help your recruitment team determine which niche job boards it will be best to post job openings to. 

  2. What type of training opportunities do we need to provide to ensure our current employees develop the skills we need?
    As the Baby Boomers enter retirement, the Millennials are entering professional employment. That means, your organization will need to prepare the training programs set in place appropriately. Because 40% of Millennials are interested in careers that allow for growth and accomplishment, training programs need to determine a career path.

Now that you’ve asked all of these questions, do you have a backup plan? Your succession plan is dependent upon how thorough the questions are answered so your organization can be prepared from A to Z when a key team player leaves the company. Give your team the tools they need to keep the organization thriving as Baby Boomers retire. They have big shoes to fill and with a succession plan, it will be much simpler for your team to compensate for any gaps in the team.

To learn more about developing an effective succession and career pathing process check out our Best Practices Guide-

"3 Steps To Achieve Talent Development That Drives Organizational Success"

 

Tags: Leadership, Succession Planning, training management, talent development, recruiting strategy, career pathing

Can You Train Employees for Resilience?

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Jun, 10, 2015 @ 07:06 AM

When first onboarding a new hire, what do you hope to instill in them? A sense of belonging to your company culture? A quick adoption of the skills they need to get the job done? A passion for the field and a commitment to good work? These are all laudable principles, but often they’re more expected from the start than taught.

Organizations need to commit to real teaching and perhaps most importantly, they need to train employees how to learn. If you find someone who can’t seem to get over their mistakes, can you teach them to get back up again?

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Learning Through Failure

Most on-the-job training comes in two forms: shadowing someone else while they work and learning by doing. It’s entirely possible to learn a skill simply by performing it over and over, but what many people attempting to pick up something new (or learn the ins and outs of a job) don’t realize is that learning is more about rectifying the mistakes than basking in the glow of your accomplishments. It’s why taking risks is important to growing as a company, but companies are becoming increasingly risk-averse, steering back any attempts towards something new back to the status quo.

Tweet This: What are the two best ways to learn a new task? Give up? 

This stressful environment has led to a workforce that can’t stand failure, and it’s making the workplace a bad place to be. A recent survey from Morneau Shepell revealed that 98% of physicians believe that the workplace is generally making employees less healthy. When employees have to be perfect in every aspect of their job, when they can’t afford to make mistakes, they will eventually plateau for fear of trying new things and failing, and eventually lose productivity due to health issues.

Why Resilience is Key

Resilience allows us to recover from our failures, which then allows us to learn from our mistakes. Once we identify why we committed an error or where we’ve faltered, we’re more likely to fix that mistake. If we’re not resilient, we dwell on our failures and dread making more mistakes, inhibiting our growth. Kathleen Barton, a professional speaker and career coach, has talked about how resilience can lead to better decision-making, since resilient people are more aware of what they can and cannot change:

"Resilient people focus their energy on those events that they have influence over, rather than situations beyond their control. They accept circumstances that cannot be changed. Entrepreneur Tim Baumgartner, an independent sales rep who sold electronics to Circuit City, was blind-sided when the company filed for bankruptcy. Within months, however, he launched an online consumer electronics store. 'Whining and complaining about how you find yourself here doesn’t help,' Baumgartner says. 'I’ve refocused my energy on the start-up."

Tweet This: "Resilient people focus their energy on those events that they have influence over." 

Developing Resilience

Companies want to make workers more productive, and training employees to roll with the punches is an important step towards reaching that goal. If employees aren’t taught to be open about their shortcomings, they will begin to hide and misattribute them, and feeling as though they are more inept than they really are, leading to employees feeling like they’re impostors.

There are already tons of initiatives to promote employee resilience, so there is proof that everyone can learn to get better from their mistakes. Resilience starts with culture; let your people know that it’s okay to fail, that new ideas don’t always work out, but are necessary in order for businesses to grow. This will help them make the right mistakes, turn them into successes later on, and learn the value of resilience.

No matter what skill you want to teach employees, Visibility Software’s online training software, Cyber Train, can help you get the job done. Take our software for a spin and see what you’re missing!

Cyber Train Demo

Tags: cyber train, training management