Succession Planning: The Core Issue of Leadership Failings

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Mar, 22, 2017 @ 10:03 AM

planning.jpeg

An organizational succession plan should always have a plan B. It is one of the biggest problems for any business and a core issue for leadership. Succession planning is like an insurance plan for the survival of your business. So it stands to reason then, that if you don’t have a succession plan, you can’t ensure that your business will survive after your resignation. The good news is, it’s never too late to start the development of a succession plan. All you and your team have to do is answer a few questions and write the plan to set it in motion once it’s needed.

Succession planning was recently identified as one of the top three immediate HR issues that needed to be dealt with (Bersin and Associates). It’s no easy task however, and as it becomes a higher priority as Baby Boomers enter retirement (3.6 million baby boomers were expected to retire this year) it’s of growing importance to be able to answer these questions. 

  1. How many people will be leaving the organization - both voluntarily and involuntarily - over the next 5-7 years?
    The youngest Baby Boomers turn 50 this year and are preparing to retire. Your organization has to be ready for the retirement or removal of key players to the team. The maturing age group makes up 13% of the American population, and that could mean a large percentage of employees retiring from your organization.

  1. What skill sets will those employees who are leaving take with them?
    In preparation for several key members to leave the organization, understand what their positions are. Detail job descriptions accordingly so the team can adjust functionally and culturally for the impending change.

  1. Will we recruit externally or promote from within to fill those gaps?
    A vast majority of organizations - 77% of them - realize the significance of internally recruiting candidates for promotion. However, even though so many understand this key fact, 54% do less than one-third of their recruitment from within the organization. Take into account the financial responsibility of committing to an external recruitment plan and if that’s a risk your organization is willing to take. While internal recruitment strategies may save the budget, external recruitment can bring life and fresh ideas into the office.

  1. What’s going on outside the organization that could affect my ability to recruit the employees we need?
    Pay attention to economic and employment trends. Mass layoffs and the size of college graduating classes are just two examples that can have an impact on how your team formulates a recruitment strategy.

  1. Where is the supply of candidates going to come from?
    Your career page, job boards, and social job advertisement all have a part in recruitment strategies. What do they have in common? They are all on the internet. Online recruiting can save companies as much as 50% in cost-per-hire.

  1. Where will our company be in 3-5 years, and what does that mean for the type of people we will need to recruit?
    Projecting your organizational needs as well as employee needs can help decide the future of your team. This can help your recruitment team determine which niche job boards it will be best to post job openings to. 

  2. What type of training opportunities do we need to provide to ensure our current employees develop the skills we need?
    As the Baby Boomers enter retirement, the Millennials are entering professional employment. That means, your organization will need to prepare the training programs set in place appropriately. Because 40% of Millennials are interested in careers that allow for growth and accomplishment, training programs need to determine a career path.

Now that you’ve asked all of these questions, do you have a backup plan? Your succession plan is dependent upon how thorough the questions are answered so your organization can be prepared from A to Z when a key team player leaves the company. Give your team the tools they need to keep the organization thriving as Baby Boomers retire. They have big shoes to fill and with a succession plan, it will be much simpler for your team to compensate for any gaps in the team.

To learn more about developing an effective succession and career pathing process check out our Best Practices Guide-

"3 Steps To Achieve Talent Development That Drives Organizational Success"

 

Tags: Leadership, Succession Planning, training management, talent development, recruiting strategy, career pathing

What’s Keeping Your CEO Up at Night?

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Oct, 14, 2015 @ 07:10 AM

“It often happens that I wake up at night and begin to think about a serious problem and decide I must tell the Pope about it. Then I wake up completely and remember that I am the Pope.” - Pope John XXIII

Managers are concerned with the performance of their teams, CEOs on the other hand, have a lot more to worry about. Typically, we think of senior leadership as primarily concerned with the business, revenue and even the reputation of the organization. However, that’s not always the case. Executives are also worried about how their team functions as a whole and how individual growth and understanding plays into the bigger picture. There are the common leadership pains that keep your CEO up at night besides changes in the stock market.

Common-leadership-pains

Response to technological growth

The world of work is changing, and not just in the way we work. The way we work has been drastically altered by the developments in technology. The rapid change in technology is a challenge for 58% of CEOs because it highlights a shortage of key skills that could hinder growth. They set their hiring managers on a mission to hire the candidates who have the ability to learn and grow into the changing workplace.

“Technology is so much fun but we can drown in our technology. The fog of information can drive out knowledge.” - Daniel J. Boorstin

 

Competition in the battle for talent

The battle for these highly qualified candidates is increasingly competitive. So to stay competitive in the marketplace, CEOs have to understand that the defense for this front is talent that outperforms that of their competitors. The skills gap is a serious concern for 63% of CEOs, and in response, about half of these leaders planning to hire more people in the next 12 months.

Tweet This: How can CEOs stay competitive in the marketplace? 

“We’ve more or less solved the skills gap by recruiting and training and developing and engaging the right kind of people. It requires attention. It requires investment, all those types of things. There’s a solution to the skills gap.” Jeff Owens

 

Partnering with industry leaders

Strategic partnerships help organizations grow and collaborate. In fact, 56% of CEOs label these relationships as vital to their business. These partnerships can help CEOs build momentum in economic and talent growth, but they have to be thoughtfully planned and maintained.

“Latching on to a bigger, well-known brand through a mutually beneficial partnership is a way to quickly build your own brand and credibility.” - Matt Ehrlichman

Tweet This: Strategic partnerships help organizations grow and collaborate. Read more: 

 

Diversity in tough situations

It’s a recent ongoing initiative for CEOs, especially in male-dominated fields. Companies like Google have made progress in their gender diversity efforts with women making up 30% of the company’s overall workforce. However, these women only hold 17% of the company’s tech jobs. With the increasing social pressure to expand diversity internally, diversity remains a top concern for many CEOs.

“Diversity may be the hardest thing for a society to live with, and perhaps the most dangerous thing for a society to live without.” William Sloane Coffin Jr.

Tweet This: Diversity remains a top concern for many CEOs, here's why:


Your CEOs worry about things outside strictly economic gain, as the stereotype would suggest. The success of the teams within the organization are the foundation of their company, so therefore they are the collateral many senior leadership struggle with. Your senior leadership wants to create better teams to develop the building blocks of a better company.  They are worried about growth, competition, partnerships and diversity. Keeping the team healthy and afloat incites insomnia, and because of these concerns, CEOs stay awake at night pondering solutions and key human capital management solutions.

See-Our-Solutions

Tags: Leadership, HR Insights

Why Boring Work is Subjective and Necessary

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Sep, 09, 2015 @ 10:09 AM

boring-work

Your employee, Jill, wants to talk. She sits you down, darts her eyes around the room nervously, and comes out with it: she finds her job boring. You’re taken aback — you thought she loved her job! You might scramble to fix the problem, but you need to realize: if your employee came to you to tell you they’re bored of their job, there’s probably a bigger problem at hand. If not, then they have to realize two things: Boring is often subjective, and almost always necessary. Here’s why.

 

Boring Work is Vague

“Bored” can mean a lot of things. Some people think it’s synonymous with “disengaged” when it comes to the workplace, and would point out that only 31.5% of U.S. employees are engaged at their jobs. That might be true, but there are a number of reasons your employees could be bored at work. They could find the work unchallenging, under-stimulating or have lost their passion for their industry.

Tweet This: What do your employees really think of their jobs? 31.5% are unengaged for the following reasons: 

What’s more, “boring” isn’t something you can fix easily. Different people find different things boring, and you have to modify your approach to fit the candidates. Some people find organizing paperwork relaxing, while others find it dreadfully monotonous. Saying a job is “boring” isn’t helpful, because it doesn’t properly identify the problem. Why is the job boring? Ask your employees more about their issue. Don’t assume “boring” is bad and leave it at that.

 

Boring is Necessary

Boring isn’t always mandatory to working in certain fields — it can often be just as beneficial as the work we’re passionate about. In fact, some of the most important parts of our working lives can be the most boring. As Sharlyn Lauby (@sharlyn_lauby) explains, we still need to dedicate ourselves to whatever we might find the least exciting.

"Some of the things we need to know in our careers and lives we won’t consider fun. But we have to learn them anyway. At least if we want to be successful, we need to be capable. Here’s an example. Driving is not my favorite thing to do. But I need to know how to drive in order to go to work and school, take vacation, and run personal errands. So, I drive and give it my 100%."

Tweet This: @sharlyn_lauby gives insight about the need for staying motivated at work. Read more: 

So no matter what part of your work your employees find boring, you need to encourage your employees to do it well.

 

What to Do About Boredom

Sometimes the best way for employees to deal with boring work is to buck up and find ways to make it exciting. No matter what career they choose, work won’t be a cavalcade of fun events one after the other. The same goes for your employees. You can’t fix every issue with their job because people have to file expense reports, and those usually aren’t very fun.

However, there are times when you can take steps to fix an employee’s boredom with their job. If your employee doesn’t find their work fulfilling, and you see signs that they might be better suited for another department, don’t hesitate to ask them what they’d rather be doing. At work, 25% of employees would feel more motivated if they were doing what they did best. Take this into account when talking to an unmotivated employee. Are they burnt out, or simply looking for another outlet to apply themselves?

Tweet This: Keep your employees motivated by simply allowing them to do what they love. Read about how this works:

Like we said, curing boredom doesn’t come easily. Not every employee can be reassigned into being motivated. You may have to put up with a certain amount of disengagement at your company, because it tends to come with the territory. But this isn’t always a bad thing, and while not everyone likes boring work, “boring” means different things to different people, and it’s often necessary and vital to the workplace.

Need to find the optimal fit for every employee? For that, there’s Visibility Software’s learning management system, Cyber Train, which can track every employee’s progress in their role. Sign up for a demo today!

  Cyber Train Demo

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Tags: training, Leadership

Succession Planning: The Core Issue of Leadership Failings

Posted by Sean Pomeroy on Wed, Mar, 18, 2015 @ 07:03 AM

An organizational succession plan should always have a plan B. It is one of the biggest problems for any business and a core issue for leadership. Succession planning is like an insurance plan for the survival of your business. So it stands to reason then, that if you don’t have a succession plan, you can’t ensure that your business will survive after your resignation. The good news is, it’s never too late to start the development of a succession plan. All you and your team have to do is answer a few questions and write the plan to set it in motion once it’s needed. It’s no easy task however, and as it becomes a higher priority as Baby Boomers enter retirement it’s of growing importance to be able to answer these questions. Brendan O’Neil, Solutions Architect at CareerBuilder, provides the essential questions to ask in order to create a well-rounded succession plan:

Succession-Planning

  1. How many people will be leaving the organization - both voluntarily and involuntarily - over the next 5-7 years?
    The youngest Baby Boomers turn 50 this year and are preparing to retire. Your organization has to be ready for the retirement or removal of key players to the team. The maturing age group makes up 13% of the American population, and that could mean a large percentage of employees retiring from your organization.

  1. What skill sets will those employees who are leaving take with them?
    In preparation for several key members to leave the organization, understand what their positions are. Detail job descriptions accordingly so the team can adjust functionally and culturally for the impending change.

  1. Will we recruit externally or promote from within to fill those gaps?
    A vast majority of organizations - 77% of them - realize the significance of internally recruiting candidates for promotion. However, even though so many understand this key fact, 54% do less than one-third of their recruitment from within the organization. Take into account the financial responsibility of committing to an external recruitment plan and if that’s a risk your organization is willing to take. While internal recruitment strategies may save the budget, external recruitment can bring life and fresh ideas into the office.

  1. What’s going on outside the organization that could affect my ability to recruit the employees we need?
    Pay attention to economic and employment trends. Mass layoffs and the size of college graduating classes are just two examples that can have an impact on how your team formulates a recruitment strategy.

  1. Where is the supply of candidates going to come from?
    Your career page, job boards, and social job advertisement all have a part in recruitment strategies. What do they have in common? They are all on the internet. Online recruiting can save companies as much as 50% in cost-per-hire.

  1. Where will our company be in 3-5 years, and what does that mean for the type of people we will need to recruit?
    Projecting your organizational needs as well as employee needs can help decide the future of your team. This can help your recruitment team determine which niche job boards it will be best to post job openings to. 

  2. What type of training opportunities do we need to provide to ensure our current employees develop the skills we need?
    As the Baby Boomers enter retirement, the Millennials are entering professional employment. That means, your organization will need to prepare the training programs set in place appropriately. Because 40% of Millennials are interested in careers that allow for growth and accomplishment, training programs need to determine a career path.

Now that you’ve asked all of these questions, do you have a backup plan? Your succession plan is dependent upon how thorough the questions are answered so your organization can be prepared from A to Z when a key team player leaves the company. Give your team the tools they need to keep the organization thriving as Baby Boomers retire. They have big shoes to fill and with a succession plan, it will be much simpler for your team to compensate for any gaps in the team.

 

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Tags: cyber recruiter, Leadership, Succession Planning