Saying “yes” to Employee Engagement - It’s a long-term commitment that starts with recruiting

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Dec, 28, 2016 @ 08:12 AM

saying i do to employee engagement.jpeg

Employee engagement is a workplace concept that refers to how committed employees are to their organization’s goals and values, and how motivated they are to contribute to the organization’s success. Research has shown that highly engaged employees: 

  • Are more customer focused, more creative at work, and take less sick leave
  • Care about the future of their organization and put in greater effort to help it meet its goals and objectives
  • Feel proud of the organization they work for, are inspired to do their best, and motivated to deliver
  • Are much less likely to leave the organization.

Perhaps it’s not surprising then, that companies whose employees express a high level of engagement are more profitable, have greater revenue figures, and have higher levels of customer satisfaction. A company that values its employees and invests in them right from the beginning is laying the foundation for high levels of engagement. Here are some ways your organization can begin building employee engagement during the recruiting cycle.

Meet Them Where They’re At

Social media has quickly become a powerful recruiting tool. In fact, a recent Aberdeen Group survey reported that 68 percent of “best in class” recruiters think social media is “crucial” to their recruitment strategies. Your company’s LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter accounts can help you spread the word about new job opportunities. They also help put a human touch on your organization, providing a way to introduce and showcase elements of your corporate culture and mission.

Respect Their Time

Strive to be an employer that respects candidates’ time and efforts by streamlining the application process. Post open positions to your company’s website and/or an online job board like Monster.com® and Careerbuilder.com®. Make it simple for them to apply to more than one position at a time. And, send an acknowledgement email letting them know that their resume was received. An applicant tracking and recruiting solution, like Cyber Recruiter, can automate and streamline these tasks, integrating them fully into your workflow.

Conduct Effective Interviews

An interview is the first impression for both employer and candidate. It’s not only a chance for you to assess the candidate; it’s also the candidate’s chance to observe your corporate culture. As many as 42 percent of companies now employee video conferencing (solutions like Spark Hire) in the interview process. This is a great way to give both parties that vital first impression without either of you incurring the expense of an in-person interview.

Make Your Proposal  

Once you’ve identified your next hire, make the proposal a good one. Prepare and send an offer letter along with onboarding forms. Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) help speed and automate this part of the process, letting your candidate know you value them and respect their decision-making process. And of course, the applicants that were not selected deserve the same level of respect, so be certain you send them an email or letter as notification.

Prevent Information Overload

On your new employees’ first day on the job, don’t inundate them with paperwork. Much of the necessary information was gathered during the recruiting cycle, and if you’re using an ATS, that data can transfer seamlessly to your payroll and HRMS applications, eliminating the need for duplicate data entry. 

Use that first day instead to make the new employee feel welcome with an office tour, introductions to key personnel, and a welcome gift bag filled with product samples and company swag. 

Striving for high levels of employee engagement simply makes smart business sense. Think of employee engagement as a long-term, evolving relationship between your organization and your employees - one that begins long before the employee starts to work. By building employee engagement strategies into your recruiting methods, you are demonstrating that yours is a company that invests in its most valuable assets.

engagement_infographic_.jpg

For more valuable information about employee engagement and improving the talent acquisition process, check out our best practices guide - 

Best Practices Guide – 4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition

 

 Related Posts: 

Tags: company culture, employee engagement, candidate experience, Hiring, Job Candidates

Saying “I do” to Employee Engagement - It’s a long-term commitment that starts with recruiting

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, Apr, 20, 2016 @ 10:04 AM

Employee-engagement-ROI.jpg

Employee engagement is a workplace concept that refers to how committed employees are to their organization’s goals and values, and how motivated they are to contribute to the organization’s success. Research has shown that highly engaged employees: 

  • Are more customer focused, more creative at work, and take less sick leave
  • Care about the future of their organization and put in greater effort to help it meet its goals and objectives
  • Feel proud of the organization they work for, are inspired to do their best, and motivated to deliver
  • Are much less likely to leave the organization.

Perhaps it’s not surprising then, that companies whose employees express a high level of engagement are more profitable, have greater revenue figures, and have higher levels of customer satisfaction. A company that values its employees and invests in them right from the beginning is laying the foundation for high levels of engagement. Here are some ways your organization can begin building employee engagement during the recruiting cycle.

Meet Them Where They’re At

Social media has quickly become a powerful recruiting tool. In fact, a recent Aberdeen Group survey reported that 68 percent of “best in class” recruiters think social media is “crucial” to their recruitment strategies. Your company’s LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter accounts can help you spread the word about new job opportunities. They also help put a human touch on your organization, providing a way to introduce and showcase elements of your corporate culture and mission.

Respect Their Time

Strive to be an employer that respects candidates’ time and efforts by streamlining the application process. Post open positions to your company’s website and/or an online job board like Monster.com® and Careerbuilder.com®. Make it simple for them to apply to more than one position at a time. And, send an acknowledgement email letting them know that their resume was received. An applicant tracking and recruiting solution, like Cyber Recruiter, can automate and streamline these tasks, integrating them fully into your workflow.

Conduct Effective Interviews

An interview is the first impression for both employer and candidate. It’s not only a chance for you to assess the candidate; it’s also the candidate’s chance to observe your corporate culture. As many as 42 percent of companies now employee video conferencing (solutions like Spark Hire) in the interview process. This is a great way to give both parties that vital first impression without either of you incurring the expense of an in-person interview.

Make Your Proposal  

Once you’ve identified your next hire, make the proposal a good one. Prepare and send an offer letter along with onboarding forms. Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) help speed and automate this part of the process, letting your candidate know you value them and respect their decision-making process. And of course, the applicants that were not selected deserve the same level of respect, so be certain you send them an email or letter as notification.

Prevent Information Overload

On your new employees’ first day on the job, don’t inundate them with paperwork. Much of the necessary information was gathered during the recruiting cycle, and if you’re using an ATS, that data can transfer seamlessly to your payroll and HRMS applications, eliminating the need for duplicate data entry. 

Use that first day instead to make the new employee feel welcome with an office tour, introductions to key personnel, and a welcome gift bag filled with product samples and company swag. 

Striving for high levels of employee engagement simply makes smart business sense. Think of employee engagement as a long-term, evolving relationship between your organization and your employees - one that begins long before the employee starts to work. By building employee engagement strategies into your recruiting methods, you are demonstrating that yours is a company that invests in its most valuable assets.

engagement_infographic_.jpg

For more valuable information about employee engagement and improving the talent acquisition process, check out our best practices guide - 

Best Practices Guide – 4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition

 

 Related Posts: 

Tags: company culture, employee engagement, candidate experience, Hiring, Job Candidates

How to Align Your Team to Create Engaged Employees

Posted by Mark Jackson on Wed, May, 13, 2015 @ 08:05 AM

What’s a football team without a quarterback? A concert without a drummer? A kitchen without the chef? Teams have needs - they all have predetermined roles necessary to produce a polished finished product. The same applies with your organization. You have a team; each individual has specific responsibilities that play a role in the final project. You simply can’t have a successful company without employees, or a manager, or senior leadership. All of these elements are the glue that holds a working company together.

Align-Your-Team-For-Employee-Engagement

Without a leadership figure to drive the company vision, employees could lose their focus on organizational goals. Likewise, without a manager to guide projects and stimulate engagement, employees are likely to join the 51% of the disengaged workforceEngaged employees perform 20% better and are 87% less likely to leave a company; so isn’t it worth it to develop an effective team to drive engagement? Here’s how you can align your workforce to work as a better team.

Who is doing what?

Explaining organizational values and goals to new hires gives each member of the team a better understanding of company performance expectations. While strong work ethic is a solid foundation in a new employee, they still need a sense of direction in order to meet company expectations. In a recent Harvard Business Review Analytic survey, 77% of respondents agreed frontline managers are important in helping their organization reach business goals

Set attainable goals for employees during the onboarding process to establish a benchmark, then build off of those goals during performance reviews. Readdress these goals on a regular basis to check the status of projects and to see if your team needs your leadership guidance.

Tweet This: 77% of surveyed respondents agree frontline managers drive business goals.

Create prime examples

If hiring managers and superiors sit at their desk with their feet up, take extended lunch breaks and slack off during work hours, it’s likely the employees will do the same. Even your top performers, your most engaged employees are subject to similar behavior. In fact, 53% of fully engaged employees admit they perform by learning how their superiors work. Set the standard for the team by performing how you expect them to work.

Don’t make promises you can’t keep

Unfortunately, 29% of employees don’t feel valued by their employers. The underlying cause? A surprising 32% of employees don’t feel their employer is always honest and truthful. Stay true to your employees to lock down their trust and loyalty. Keep the team aligned with company values and goals by continuously and openly communicating your expectations. This will form trust between superiors and employees, driving everyone to pitch in and do their part.

Tweet This: 29% of employees feel undervalued by their employers. 

Keeping close tabs on goals and achievements with your employees and maintaining trust will show your employees you care about their success for the sake of their professional development and contribution to the working company. 

Creating goals early on in the onboarding process, assessing achievements and improvements within your team, displaying success by example and building trust are all necessary elements of being a team player in your company. Show candidates you wish to hire during the interview process that your company believes in strong team building and work ethic. Don’t let poor company culture be the downfall of your team; work hard and work together to create the highest potential for your company.

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Tags: company culture, best candidates

Build Culture and Collaboration Like A Shark

Posted by Mark Jackson on Tue, Apr, 07, 2015 @ 08:04 AM

Sharks are fearsome creatures, but they’re not to be feared. Although there were only a total of three fatal shark attacks worldwide in 2014, movies and television have made us fear sharks. Sharks are indeed formidable when confronted, but whether they’re fish that look for blood or investors looking to take a small idea to the next level, you shouldn’t be afraid of looking one in the face. In fact, everyone in the world of business, including recruiters, HR reps, or anyone looking to develop a culture at their company can take a cue from these sharks to build a better workplace, without the need to go too far into the deep end.

Shark 

Rows of Teeth - Prepared For Failure

Sharks have two rows for teeth for chewing food and prey, but they actually have several rows of developing teeth behind those two rows, since they can lose several of their teeth per year. Similarly, companies looking to expand their culture and grow as a business shouldn’t be afraid to lose some teeth (or their case, money). Barbara Corcoran, Co-Founder of Barbara Corcoran Venture Partners and perhaps the world’s most famous “shark,” has described how she’s okay with parting with some serious money for the sake of innovation.

"Each year, I gave all my managers 5 percent of their operating budget to use however they wished with no accountability. If they didn't spend their mad money by year-end, they had to give it back. No one ever did, and they blew it on all kinds of stupid things like ad hoc parties and day trips, costume and movie rentals, surprise bonuses for good deeds, gifts, fortune-tellers and lots of alcohol. They also spent it on wacky business ideas—most of which didn't work. But they learned to laugh it off and, in the process of failing, tripped over some good business ideas that did work."

Use all your teeth. Don’t be afraid of trying something out and having it not work. It doesn’t have to be financially, either — taking the time to do something new, even if it won’t work out, can sometimes be worth the risk. For example when onboarding new employees, start with the right system from day one. Creating Infographic Fact Sheets for New Hires using Venngage will help new hires feel more familiar with the company, the company’s mission statement, history, founders and other key information specific to their needs.

 

Dorsal Fin - Having important signifiers 

Sharks have fins atop their bodies for better swimming and balance, but the iconic fin poking out of the water has become their calling card in film and television, giving them an intimidating presence (even if sharks don’t swim up to surface very often). Every good company has similarly an iconic logo, but this sort of imagery should also extend to the internal culture. Having something unique at your company can make the difference between employees who feel like they’re a part of something and those who are just there for the benefits. 

It doesn’t have to be a symbol, either — many companies have unique cultural traits that set them apart and make employees feel special. Zappos offers new employees $2,000 to leave because they only want people who love working there; Google lets its employees spend a fifth of their time however they want; Disney asks employees about their childhood dreams before hiring them. And it doesn’t have to just be big companies. Small companies have even more freedom when it comes to making their culture unique and interesting.

Tweet This: 86% of employees and execs cite lack of communication as responsible for workplace failures.

 

Hunt In Packs - Collaborative Culture 

Many kinds of sharks hunt in packs, making it easier to hunt larger prey and allowing them to hunt groups of fish more easily. Like these social sharks, companies should always encourage a culture of collaboration centered around a single pivot. Collaboration is so important, in fact, that 86% of employees and executives alike cite a lack of communication as responsible for workplace failures. Without the ability to talk to each other about critical tasks, it’s impossible to know who’s doing what, and creating teams for projects helps alleviate this. What’s more, making sure employees aren’t afraid to ask for help on difficult tasks will help everyone out in the long run. 

Tweet This: 90% of companies improved productivity after implementing a collaboration system.

If you’re looking for a good way to centralize your collaboration, try using a system where everyone can pitch in on tasks. 90% of companies say their productivity improved when they implemented a collaboration system in their office. Why not give it a chance? After all, the only thing you have to lose is some teeth.

Visibility Software Learning Management System can help employees get into the swing of learning from failure, creating a more diverse employer culture and implementing collaborative practices. Sign up for a demo today and see how much more innovative your company could be!

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Tags: company culture, LMS, learning management system

Training: The Coconut Oil of the Workplace [Part One]

Posted by Kimber Crumlish on Tue, Jun, 10, 2014 @ 10:06 AM

trainingHave you seen these posts, “The 5,769 Things You Can Do With Coconut Oil”? Every once in a while we find something that just seems to be the cure-all; something that makes life easier in a lot of different ways. Well, we consider training to be the coconut oil for organizations. Training won’t whiten your teeth or speed up your metabolism, but there are a ridiculous amount of areas in which training can drive success in any organization.

Bridging the Skill Gap

A recent CareerBuilder study revealed that 54% of employers currently have open positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates. So unless recruiters worldwide just got crappy at their jobs overnight, there is actually a skill gap. Solid training software, coupled with the right training content, can make the world of difference where your organization’s skill gaps are concerned.

Empowering Workers

Workers need to be empowered with the tools and knowledge to succeed in their positions. There are often times when an under performer or bad attitude aren’t actually the case. Employee development needs to be fostered in order for employees to feel like they’re good at what they do. Workplace leadership expert, Kevin Daum said:

“Budget dollars and time toward management and personal development training. Help employees set a plan for growth, and reward them as they advance. They'll be grateful and apply their newly-learned skills as they step up to leadership opportunities.”

Increasing Employee Engagement

Surprisingly enough, financial motivators lost to non-financial motivators such as opportunities for growth in the workplace, which 76% of respondents in a Badgeville survey chose. It makes perfect sense that a more capable, knowledgeable employee, is going to put more discretionary effort into their work, than an employee who struggles through the day.

Lowering Turnover Rates

Offering career development programs is a proven, effective method for increasing employee retention. When employees see opportunity for advancement within the company, there is less reason to look externally for their personal success. Training expert, Kathy Wellings said:

“If an employer does not offer learning and development opportunities, they risk losing talented staff and ending up with poor performers. Demotivation due to inadequate training or opportunities to learn and to advance within the company forces frustrated employees to look elsewhere for professional and personal satisfaction.”

Improved Customer Service and Support

Whether you’re selling a product or a service, the employees who take care of your customers are going to need the right training to be effective and efficient in all dealings. These people are the face and voice of your organization. Are they projecting the company culture? Do they even know how? 

In customer service positions, employees are quite often not given the authority or direction to effectively fix anything or make a wrong a right for customers. Without the empowerment and freedom to offer customers what they’re looking for, the employee simply becomes a go-between, or someone for the customer to vent to. Bryan Pearson, President and CEO of LoyaltyOne, said:

“The best way to foster loyalty among employees is to empower them to make decisions that improve the customer experience,” he said. “Provide them with the information and customer data that will help them make better-informed decisions in real time.”

Stay tuned next week for the second half of our laundry list of organizational areas in which training can make a positive impact. If you would like to know more right away, we can do that too! Take a demo of Cyber Train, or give us a call right away so we can get started.

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Tags: cyber train, training, candidates, company culture, candidate experience, recruiter